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Health Benefits and Hydroponics of Thyme

Updated: Oct 28, 2021

Thyme is a perennial herb that’s rich in nutrition as well as taste. And both these qualities are responsible for their culinary and medicinal uses. Here’s a brief overview of their chemistry, health benefits, and hydroponic cultivation.





Hydroponics of Thyme

Thyme is one of the most easily grown herbs in a Hydroponic system. It’s low-maintenance and requires the following things:


Hydroponic System

The nutrient film technique is the ideal hydroponic system to grow thyme.


Light and Temperature Requirement

Thyme leaves tend to grow better in full sunlight conditions. And the ideal temperature falls in the range of 65° F To 70°F.


Nutrient Solution

A concentrated nutrient solution of 3.6 mS/cm is ideal for maximizing the yield of thyme. (Udagawa)


The use of NPK fertilizers with a ratio of 1:0.75:3.33 or 1:0.37:1.67 improves the quality and yield of essential oil in thyme.


In most cultures, thyme is a regular part of the diet, partly because it enhances the taste of whole foods and cuisines and offers so many health benefits.


Nutritional Profile of Thyme

The spice form of thyme is richer in nutrients than the fresh one. (FoodCentral, 2019) Its nutritional profile consists of the following things:

Carbohydrates

Thyme is a rich source of carbohydrates and dietary fibers.

Protein

It’s considerably low on proteins. But it has the highest concentration of valine, an essential amino acid.

Minerals

A hundred grams of thyme can fulfill 3/4th of the body’s daily calcium requirement. Besides calcium, it also stores a bulk amount of potassium, magnesium, and iron.


Health Benefits of Thyme

Respiratory Benefits

Carvacrol and thymol stimulate the lung tissues to secrete mucous and enhance ciliary movement. The result is a decongestive response, which helps in alleviating respiratory disorders like bronchitis, whooping cough, and mucosa inflammation. (Singletary, 2016)


Chemistry of Thyme

Data regarding the chemical composition of thyme leaves are limited to essential oils and their constituents.

A class of chemical compounds called phenolic monoterpenes constitute much of the essential oil present in its leaves. And they give the leaves their characteristic aroma. (Heinonen & Yanishlieva-Maslarova, 2001)


The peculiar thing about thyme is that the chemical composition of their essential oil varies geographically. (Jaafari, Mouse, & Rakib, 2007). For example, a Moroccan thyme leaf consists of the following compounds: carvacrol, thymol, and borneol. Meanwhile, the same leaf extract in the USA has the following chemical composition: thymol, carvacrol, linalool, a-terpineol, and 1,8-cineole.


References

FoodCentral. (2019, April 1). Retrieved from U.S. Department of Agriculture: https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/170938/nutrients


Heinonen, I., & Yanishlieva-Maslarova, N. (2001). Sources of natural antioxidants: vegetables, fruits, herbs, spices and teas. Woodhead Publishing Series.


Jaafari, A., Mouse, H. A., & Rakib, E. M. (2007, December). Chemical composition and antitumor activity of different wild varieties of Moroccan thyme. Brazilian Journal of Pharmacognosy. doi:https://doi.org/10.1590/S0102-695X2007000400002


Singletary, K. (2016). Thyme History, Applications, and Overview of Potential Health Benefits. Nutrition Today, 51(1), 40-49. Retrieved from https://journals.lww.com/nutritiontodayonline/Fulltext/2016/01000/Thyme_History,_Applications,_and_Overview_of.10.aspx


Udagawa, Y. (n.d.). SOME RESPONSES OF DILL (ANETHUM GRAVEOLENS) AND THYME (THYMUS VULGARIS), GROWN IN HYDROPONIC, TO THE CONCENTRATION OF NUTRIENT SOLUTION. International Society for Horticultural Science. doi:https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1995.396.24



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